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FAQ2021-07-16T16:47:42-07:00
Does the COVID-19 vaccine alter your DNA?2021-02-05T23:58:31-08:00

The mRNA in the first two COVID-19 vaccines does not go into the nucleus of your cells (where your DNA is located). All the mRNA does is stimulate your cells to make copies of a certain protein to help your immune system, and then it breaks down and is eliminated from your body. It does not affect your DNA in any way.

Does the COVID-19 vaccine give you COVID-19?2021-02-05T23:57:59-08:00

The COVID-19 vaccine does not (and simply cannot) give anyone COVID-19, as it does not contain the virus at all. The mRNA vaccine works by encouraging your own cells to make copies of a special protein that is contained in the coronavirus. This helps your immune system recognize the real virus—and fight it off—if it ever enters your body. The protein is not a virus, and does not cause any type of infection.

The COVID-19 vaccine was developed very quickly. How do we know it is safe and effective?2021-02-05T23:57:25-08:00

While it’s true that the COVID-19 vaccine was developed quickly, it does have enough safety and efficacy data to be trustworthy. Here’s why these companies were able to make life-saving COVID-19 vaccines so quickly:

  • Both Moderna and Pfizer used a method of vaccine creation that has been in development for several years, enabling both companies to start working on their vaccines early on in the pandemic.
  • Researchers did not skip any safety or testing steps; rather, they worked on more than one step at a time to enable them to gather the necessary information more quickly.
  • The first two vaccines to hit the market were developed using messenger RNA, or mRNA—a cutting-edge approach that is much faster than more old-fashioned ways of making vaccines.
  • Unlike less-common diseases, COVID-19 is very contagious and very widespread, so it only took a few months collect enough data to learn that the vaccines were effective.
Does the COVID-19 vaccine affect fertility?2021-02-05T23:56:55-08:00

The myth that COVID-19 affects fertility first showed up on social media, when a fake report stated that the coronavirus spike protein was identical to another spike protein known as “syncitin-1,” which plays a key role in placental growth and attachment in the early stages of pregnancy. According to the fake report, the COVID-19 vaccine would teach a woman’s immune system not only to fight off the coronavirus, but also syncitin-1, causing problems with fertility.

In reality, the two spike proteins are completely different—they just happen to look somewhat similar in appearance. The COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t cause a woman’s body to reject the syncitin-1 protein; in fact, if this were true, then most women would already be infertile, as the common cold virus also has a very similar spike protein structure.

Do I have to quarantine if I fly into California?  2021-01-27T01:56:15-08:00

Yes. The state mandates that anyone traveling into California needs to quarantine for 10 days and monitor their health during 14 days after they arrive. If feel ill during that 14 day period, they need to self-isolate and contact a health care providers. Some counties, may be more restrictive in their isolation and quarantine measures, but not less restrictive. The State of California guidelines and Los Angeles County guidelines provide more details.

How can I find out more about when vaccinations are available?2021-01-27T01:56:54-08:00

Vaccine eligibility will be determined by phases of prioritization developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as guidance developed by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) until sufficient supply of COVID-19 vaccine becomes available. Local planning is used to further refine these categories and assist in implementation based on the current status and trends in transmission in LA County. Area students, faculty and staff can track availability for their county by visiting the following websites:

Los Angeles County
San Bernardino County
Riverside County
Orange County

 

Where can I get more information about COVID-19?2021-01-27T01:57:41-08:00
Whom do I contact in a medical emergency?2021-01-27T01:57:51-08:00

If you feel you are having a medical emergency,

On-campus students: immediately call Campus Safety at 909-607-2000 (x72000) or dial 911

Off-campus/local students: call 911 immediately

Faculty/staff: immediately call Campus Safety at 909-607-2000 (x72000) or dial 911

What are some emergency warning signs of a COVID-19 infection?2021-01-27T02:02:06-08:00

Some of the emergency warning signs* for COVID-19 are listed below. If someone is showing any of these signs, they should seek emergency medical care immediately

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not inclusive of all the possible emergency symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

I test positive for COVID-19. What should I do?2021-01-27T02:02:17-08:00

Remain in isolation until released from isolation by your healthcare provider

Monitor for any worsening of symptoms. If you do feel your symptoms worsening, seek medical assistance:

If you feel you are having a medical emergency,

On-campus students: immediately call Campus Safety at 909-607-2000 (x72000) or dial 911

Off-campus/local students: call 911 immediately

Faculty/staff: immediately call Campus Safety at 909-607-2000 (x72000) or dial 911

For non-emergent evaluation,

On campus/local students: please contact Student Health Services (SHS) at 909-621-8222 (x18222). Our healthcare professionals will help you determine the next steps in your evaluation and treatment. Outside of SHS business hours, please use the Telehealth Service for a virtual visit or contact Campus Security at 909-607-2000 (x72000) for assistance.

Off-campus students: Please use the Telehealth service for a virtual visit or contact your local primary care physician for further guidance.

Faculty/staff: Please contact your primary care physician for further guidance.

Can I get COVID-19 testing on campus?2021-01-27T02:02:25-08:00

Yes, Student Health Services (SHS) will have some on-site testing capacity for COVID-19 testing. However, availability of test kits may be affected at any time during the school year, depending on supply chain issues from our vendors. If one of our healthcare providers determines that you need to be tested for COVID-19, they will advise you of the available testing options at that time. Presently, there is NO CHARGE to students for COVID-19 testing at SHS.

Contact Student Health Services (SHS) at 909-621-8222 (x18222).

Faculty and staff should contact their personal health care provider for testing. Testing options and details are also available here:  https://covid19.ca.gov/testing-and-treatment/

How do I get tested for COVID-19?2021-01-27T02:02:32-08:00

The Student Health Services (SHS) will have some on-site testing capacity for COVID-19 testing. However, availability of test kits may be affected at any time during the school year, depending on supply chain issues from our vendors. If one of our healthcare providers determines that you need to be tested for COVID-19, they will advise you of the available testing options at that time. Presently, there is NO CHARGE to students for COVID-19 testing at SHS.

Contact the Student Health Services (SHS) at 909-621-8222 (x18222).

Faculty and staff should contact their personal health care provider for testing. Testing options and details are also available here:  https://covid19.ca.gov/testing-and-treatment/

I have symptoms/I was exposed to someone with COVID-19. What should I do?2021-01-27T02:02:46-08:00

First thing to do is immediately quarantine yourself. Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with the virus without feeling symptoms. People in quarantine should stay home and separate themselves from others. Quarantine usually lasts at least 10 days from your last contact with a person who has COVID-19, even if you test negative for COVID-19 during quarantine. You should not leave quarantine until you have been released from quarantine by your healthcare provider. Please see these guidelines for quarantining.

After quarantining yourself, you should contact a healthcare provider for further advice:

On-campus/local students: please contact Student Health Services (SHS) at 909-621-8222 (x18222). Our healthcare professionals will help you determine the next steps in your evaluation and treatment. Outside of SHS business hours, please use the Telehealth Service for a virtual visit or contact Campus Security at 909-607-2000 (x72000) for assistance. We will also help you get connected with the appropriate resources to coordinate academic and residential life.

Off-campus students: Please use the Telehealth service for a virtual visit or contact your local primary care physician for further guidance. Secondly, please contact your Dean of Students so they can provide the appropriate academic resources for you.

Faculty/staff: Please contact your primary care physician for further guidance. Also, inform your supervisor or human resources (HR) department so they can discuss appropriate resources available to you.

How do I “home quarantine” following a close contact?2021-01-27T02:02:53-08:00

In Los Angeles County, if you have been in close contact with a person diagnosed with COVID-19 you are required to:

  1. Quarantine – stay home and separate yourself from others for 10 days
  2. Monitor your health for 14 days
  3. Follow the Health Officer Quarantine Order

It is recommended that you get tested* for COVID-19. Individuals traveling into Los Angeles County from outside Los Angeles should self-quarantine for 10 days. More details are available on the Los Angeles County Public Health website.

How can I reduce my risk of exposure to COVID-19?2021-01-27T02:03:08-08:00

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. That’s why it’s important for everyone to practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet away from other people) and wear cloth face coverings in public settings. Cloth face coverings provide an extra layer to help prevent the respiratory droplets from traveling in the air and onto other people.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?2021-01-27T02:03:18-08:00

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

Please note that this list does not include all possible COVID-19 symptoms.

What is COVID-19?2021-01-27T02:03:24-08:00

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans.

Will TCCS SHS provide the vaccine to the TCC community? 2021-01-27T02:03:36-08:00

The Claremont Colleges’ (TCC) goal is to vaccinate all staff and faculty as soon as possible. As a potential way of accomplishing this, TCCS SHS has submitted an application with CalVax to become a vaccination site as part of the California COVID-19 Vaccination Program. SHS is currently awaiting approval from the State of California and then anticipates placing a vaccine order and hopefully receiving a vaccine allocation from state and local public health authorities. Once our application is approved and the supply is provided, SHS will work toward offering a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at The Claremont Colleges (TCC). SHS will be allowed to administer COVID-19 vaccinations only when vaccinations for workers in the education sector are green-lighted by public health officials. This will then allow TCC employees (faculty/staff) to get vaccinated; however, it will not permit vaccinations for students. It is anticipated that most student vaccinations will occur in Phase 2 of Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization and Allocation, though there may be some exceptions to get vaccinated during an earlier phase based on a student’s health status and risk factors. We strongly encourage you to get vaccinated sooner if you have the opportunity to do so through the County or other resources. 

 At some point, will SHS provide vaccines to students? 2021-01-27T02:03:41-08:00

Once SHS is approved to be a COVID-19 vaccine provider, SHS could provide COVID-19 vaccination in the fall for any students who have not yet been vaccinated (subject to vaccine availability). Also, if booster vaccines are recommended in the future (annually or some other frequency), SHS would look to provide those as well. 

Are the COVID-19 vaccines safe? 2021-01-27T02:03:45-08:00

Yes. There are many strict protections in place and steps taken during vaccine development to ensure that any vaccine authorized for use is proven to be safe and effective. Vaccine developers are required to go through a rigorous, multi-stage process including large (phase III) trials that involve tens of thousands of participants. After the clinical trials show that the vaccine is safe and effective, a series of independent reviews and evidence are required to demonstrate efficacy and safety. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for making sure that FDA-authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. 

 If I had COVID-19 and recovered, should I still get the vaccine? 2021-01-27T02:03:51-08:00

Yes. Early findings suggest natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long. More studies are needed. 

Will the vaccine cause adverse reaction or side effects? 2021-01-27T02:04:01-08:00

There is a potential for injection site reactions (redness, swelling, and pain) as well as fever, fatigue, headache, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain, and/or joint pain. Similar adverse reactions are commonly seen with other vaccines as well. To ensure the vaccine is effective, it is important that you receive the second dose even if you experience side effects after the first dose. 

If I get the vaccine, do I still need to wear a mask and practice social distancing? 2021-01-27T02:04:07-08:00

Yes. Vaccines may boost your immune system so it is ready to fight the virus if you are exposed, but it is not yet fully understood whether vaccinated people might still be able to transmit the virus. Initially, we will not have enough vaccines to vaccinate everyone who wants it, and the virus will still be in the community. Therefore, wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and frequently washing your hands will help reduce your chance of being exposed to and spreading the virus. 

The Claremont Colleges consortial COVID-19 website was last updated March 2021. New update to come August 2021.

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